ISSN 2306-0557
Home > Archives > VOLUME 5 / APRIL 2014 >

VOLUME 5 / APRIL 2014


VOL - 5 / 2014 - APR


Download full issue

Renegades: From Homer to Heller

Abstract

In this paper I will be focused on the war principles and its consequences from Homer up to Heller. In a research on century Homeric epos called “Iliad or a poem of power?” Simon Wail wrote : The only people who impress us and give the impression that they stay higher than ordinary people, who have do a superiority over pain, sadness and human suffering, are those people who self accommodate in the furrows of illusion, excitement and fanaticism to hide the icy roughness in their eyes, in their spirits that plows only pain. The man who does not wear the armor of lie cannot survive violence without touching himself up to its spirit depths! Insanity of inherent war which turns the stable morality of human values of everybody’s, as well as the material and immaterial institutions in a big grabable hollow of values up siding them down. It is not weird, at least in the literature. The best critics of war
literature are insane or ridiculous, or bastards or perverted. Although we (even the authors) can laugh with them, we can distance ourselves from what they say, our laughter can illuminate our minds in a moment, even it inluences in transforming our mindset, questioning in our common sense on war in general. Renegades always
are in war with the evil without excluding themselves from being defeated from the evil. In conclusion, a renegade is someone who rebels, a deserter. He or she betrays or deserts his or her cause, faith or political party. A renegade can be a rebel who breaks the conventional rules, a coward, a recreant that quits from a cause or a principle. Renegades have existed since the antiquity up to postmodern times.

Keywords

Renegade; Heller; Postmodern literature; Power; Rebel; Deserter

Authors

Anita NEZIRI

Download Article

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.